Vive lindifférence! Netflixs Room 2806 exposes Frances #MeToo apathy – The Guardian

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Most people will have just the haziest recollection of the fallout that happened after the French governmental enthusiastic and then head of the International Monetary Fund Dominique Strauss-Kahn was accused of sexually attacking a space attendant in a New York hotel in 2011. That enables the Netflix documentary Room 2806: The Accusation to possess all the qualities of a slick political thriller.
This tense, four-part documentary has amazing material to work with. There is lots of CCTV footage, shot from the ceiling, of chambermaid Nafissatou Diallo making her way to the governmental suite, and later, visibly distressed, being shepherded by her manager to a subterranean network of worn-out staff workplaces in the bowels of the building, away from the gilded foyer, where she cleans away tears and states how she has actually been assaulted by Strauss-Kahn as she cleaned his rooms.There is the 911 call made by a hotel manager on behalf of Diallo and CCTV footage of Strauss-Kahn swiftly checking out of the hotel. There are in-depth interviews with Diallo explaining her reluctance to go to the cops, and laying out how the occasions of that day changed her life. There are significant contributions from the New York authorities and district attorneys, recreating the moment when Strauss-Kahn was jailed on board an Air France jet that was about to take off from JFK for Paris, and taken to prison in New York.But the most remarkable element of this documentary is the pre-Harvey Weinstein, pre- #MeToo indulgent reaction from french voters and fellow political leaders. Strauss-Kahn mounted a strong defence, keeping to this day that the incident was consensual. In New York, a few of his IMF colleagues simply shrugged, concluding: “What do you anticipate? Hes French.” In France, his fans were former and forgiving Socialist party ministers backed him robustly, and continue to safeguard him 10 years on. Talked to for the program, Jack Lang, the previous minister of culture, asks: “Et alors? Et alors? Should the president not be a sensual guy?”
Quite what happened in space 2806 remains objected to. (spoiler alert) the sexual assault charges were dropped, Diallo won a undisclosed but significant settlement after releasing a civil action. The case triggered reports of less-contested episodes of so-called sensuous behaviour. DSK in an automobile with prostitutes in Pariss notorious Bois de Boulogne; DSK acting strongly to a prostitute at a late-night swingers celebration arranged for him in provincial France; DSK assaulting a 23-year-old journalist who was trying to interview him.And yet the benign method to Strauss-Kahn endures. Why would he feel the need to attack ladies, an associate asks. “He is a charming, fantastic, smart, periodically amusing male. Why would he require to resort to that?” A French tv expert asks why anybody finds this shocking– male politicians fondness for sex is just part of the countrys culture.The French have long expressed impatience at the British tabloid obsession with the personal lives of political leaders, affecting a high-minded lack of interest, insisting that they should have a private life. In 2021, this idea of la vie privée simply appears like a brazen method designed to allow male French political leaders to behave appallingly. If its rude to ask concerns, then are they unable to deal with ladies as terribly as they please? Its difficult to think of a female French political leader who has had to argue that her personal life needs to stay personal. President Mitterrand ran 2 homes and two families, President Chirac was permitted a number of affairs (and was understood to his security staff as “5 minutes consisting of shower”), and François Hollande raced through his partners.Nafissatou Diallo in Room 2806: The Accusation. Picture: NetflixThis cultural indulgence is laid bare in Room 2806s most shocking scene. Author Tristane Banon recounts how she was assaulted by DSK in 2002, aged 23, after interviewing him for Paris Match, where she had just recently started working as an intern. She remembers being amazed that he called her after the first interview to inform her he had more to state, and welcoming her to a 2nd meeting at a flat near the National Assembly. She keeps in mind thinking it was odd that the flat was totally empty when she arrived, no books, no possessions, however switched on her recording gadget and started the interview.
DSK informed her he would not speak unless she held his hand, and turned off the recorder. He tried to undress her, she tells the film-makers, they wound up combating on the couch, and she had the ability to get away from the flat. She says she didnt believe she would have been taken seriously if she had reported him to the authorities, however she did describe the attack five years later a TV chatshow to a group mostly comprised of middle-aged men.The video is discovered and included. There is some hilarity as she explains how DSK attempted to reverse her bra and her jeans, and disregards her shouting rape. The host, Thierry Ardisson, states: “Oh, j adore!” and the other guests laugh. Banon is smiling, but looks uneasy. No one expresses shock or anger.” When I said I like it!, its due to the fact that I can tell this is juicy, its going to develop a buzz,” a semi-apologetic Ardisson describes to the documentary makers, acknowledging that a decade later this appears a distinctly unusual action. “Im not stating I like rape.” However he too shrugs, as if the story is hardly worth mentioning on. “Politicians that catch girls– it was common and still is. The libertinism and debauchery of the 18th century, thats part of the culture.”
These attitudes stay absurdly out-of-date yet absolutely current.Strauss-Kahn decreased to be talked to for the documentary, and has no criminal record, the filmmakers keep in mind. Diallos reputation was adequately smeared by Strauss-Kahns defence team: she was forced to leave her home and was not able to return to her job. Still, she says she gets some faint satisfaction in seeing the role she played in persuading others to come forward, in a small wave of fury, foreshadowing the #MeToo movement.Room 2806 is available on Netflix

A lot of people will have just the haziest recollection of the fallout that took place after the French presidential enthusiastic and then head of the International Monetary Fund Dominique Strauss-Kahn was accused of sexually attacking a space attendant in a New York hotel in 2011. There is plenty of CCTV video, filmed from the ceiling, of chambermaid Nafissatou Diallo making her way to the presidential suite, and later on, noticeably distressed, being shepherded by her supervisor to a subterranean network of worn-out personnel offices in the bowels of the structure, away from the gilded foyer, where she cleans away tears and recounts how she has been assaulted by Strauss-Kahn as she cleaned his rooms.There is the 911 call made by a hotel supervisor on behalf of Diallo and CCTV video of Strauss-Kahn quickly checking out of the hotel. There are remarkable contributions from the New York cops and district attorneys, recreating the moment when Strauss-Kahn was jailed on board an Air France jet that was about to take off from JFK for Paris, and taken to prison in New York.But the most amazing element of this documentary is the pre-Harvey Weinstein, pre- #MeToo indulgent reaction from french voters and fellow politicians. DSK in an automobile with woman of the streets in Pariss well-known Bois de Boulogne; DSK acting strongly to a prostitute at a late-night swingers party arranged for him in provincial France; DSK assaulting a 23-year-old reporter who was attempting to interview him.And yet the benign method to Strauss-Kahn endures. A French tv pundit asks why anybody discovers this shocking– male political leaders fondness for sex is just part of the nations culture.The French have long revealed impatience at the British tabloid fascination with the personal lives of politicians, impacting a high-minded absence of interest, insisting that they should have a personal life.

Documentary
Centred on a sex-assault case including former French presidential hopeful Dominique Strauss-Kahn, this docuseries reveals worryingly outdated mindsets

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