New report details Cyberpunk 2077s development troubles, crunch and “almost entirely fake” E3 demo – Eurogamer.net

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CD Projekts approach to crunch has come under fire recently. In September 2020, CD Projekt told employees it would need them to work six-day weeks up until the video games November launch (it was consequently postponed to December), breaking a previous guarantee not to require obligatory overtime to end up the job.
This new, required overtime was paid, as is required by Polish law, however followed many staff members were supposedly working long hours already.
At the time, Badowski tweeted to say: “This is among the hardest choices Ive had to make, but everyone is well compensated for every extra hour they put in. And, like in current years, 10 percent of the yearly earnings our company produces in 2020 will be split straight amongst the group.”
When CD Projekt delayed Cyberpunk a final time to December, it said it was having a hard time to deliver the big number of different variations of the video game it needed to have ready this year – consisting of next-gen and current consoles, PC and Google Stadia.
Bloomberg reveals the extent of the crunch that happened at the studio for many years, with some personnel saying they felt pressured to put in extra hours by their supervisors or coworkers.

Bloomberg reports Cyberpunk 2077s distinctive E3 2018 demonstration “was nearly totally phony”. “CD Projekt had not yet settled and coded the underlying gameplay systems, which is why so lots of functions, such as cars and truck ambushes, were missing from the last product,” Bloomberg stated. “Developers stated they felt like the demonstration was a waste of months that must have gone toward making the video game.”
Made them feel ostracized, they stated … were their coworkers talking shit about them? Ideas now turn to CD Projekts continuous effort to turn Cyberpunk 2077 around.

– A few non-Polish staffers shared stories about colleagues using Polish in front of them, which breached business rules. Made them feel ostracized, they said … were their coworkers talking shit about them? Combined with crunch and low salaries, this led numerous expats to stop– Jason Schreier (@jasonschreier) January 16, 2021

– And if youre wondering why the police system in Cyberpunk 2077 is so janky: well, it was all done at the last minute. As appears by the last product, it was unclear to a few of the team why they were trying to make both an RPG and a GTA with a fraction of Rockstars personnel– Jason Schreier (@jasonschreier) January 16, 2021

Thoughts now turn to CD Projekts continuous effort to turn Cyberpunk 2077 around. The studio prepares to launch variably sized patches – planned to repair bugs and improve the experience throughout all platforms – “on a routine basis”. The first of these is due next week, with another more considerable spot to follow in the coming weeks.
But will Cyberpunk 2077 spots suffice to restore CD Projekts credibility in the eyes of financiers and fans?

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A brand-new report has shed fresh light on Cyberpunk 2077s troubled development.
According to Bloombergs advancement sources (paywall), Cyberpunk 2077 struggled with a raft of technical issues and unrealistic due dates set by CD Projekt management.
Cyberpunk 2077s dreadful December 2020 launch, which revealed major technical issues with the game on consoles, and problems, bugs and cut content throughout all platforms, resulted in its removal from the PlayStation Store and a caution label on the Microsoft Store about the performance of the game on Xbox One.
Today, CD Projekt co-founder Marcin Iwiński resolved the events leading up to the messed up launch of Cyberpunk 2077 in an attempt to explain how the games extensively berated Xbox One and PlayStation 4 versions were launched in such a bad state.
According to Iwiński, problems with the console release stemmed from Cyperpunks “substantial” scope – particularly the “wide variety of custom things, engaging systems, and mechanics” all condensed into a single huge city and “in a fairly loading-free environment”.
Regardless of the significant hardware space, the studio believed “things did not look extremely tough initially”, however Iwiński conceded “time has proven that weve ignored the job”.
That proof, of course, came on launch day, when significant criticism was instantly imposed at Cyberpunks prominent bugs and dreadful performance, particularly on base consoles. However, Iwiński insisted the studios testing “did disappoint a huge part of the issues you experienced”, and that the designer saw “considerable improvements each and every day” as it got closer to release and “truly believed we d deliver in the last day zero upgrade”.
Eurogamer Next-Gen News Cast – the Star Wars games we d enjoy to see nextHowever, according to Bloomberg, CD Projekts own developers stated many common problems were found, but the personnel didnt have time to fix them prior to launch. According to Bloombergs sources, CD Projekts management dismissed concerns raised by engineers that Cyberpunk 2077 was too complex to run well on the ageing last-gen consoles.
The report also exposed that while Cyberpunk 2077 was revealed in 2012, complete development began in 2016 when studio head Adam Badowski took over as director and overhauled the game, including moving it from third-person to first-person.
Bloomberg reports Cyberpunk 2077s captivating E3 2018 demonstration “was almost totally phony”. “CD Projekt hadnt yet finalised and coded the underlying gameplay systems, which is why so lots of features, such as cars and truck ambushes, were missing out on from the end product,” Bloomberg said. “Developers stated they felt like the demo was a waste of months that need to have approached making the game.”
Jason Schreier, author of the report, required to Twitter to reveal more, stating features originally prepared for Cyberpunk 2077, such as wall-running, flying ambushes and cars and trucks were all cut during the process of development.
CD Projekt attended to the elimination of the wall-running feature – revealed off in gameplay demos prior to launch – in a July 2020 interview. Speaking with GameReactor, level designer Max Pears said wall-running was removed “due to design factors”.
Previous gameplay had revealed player-character V using Mantis Blades to perch in hard-to-reach spots prior to jumping down to assassinate enemies. This never ever made it into the final version of the video game.
Schreier also tweeted to comment on Cyberpunk 2077s frustrating authorities system, which “was all done at the last minute”.
” As appears by the end product, it was uncertain to some of the team why they were attempting to make both an RPG and a GTA with a portion of Rockstars staff,” Schreier stated.

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