Samsung 870 Evo review – Rock Paper Shotgun

For the previous 2 years, Samsungs 860 Evo SSD has been the very best SATA drive you can purchase for your PC. Its random read and write times have been basically unequaled because it first came out in 2018 (indeed, just Samsungs 870 Qvo has managed to best it on write time), however regardless of still being best in class, Samsung are retiring it anyway and replacing it with the brand new 870 Evo.

Samsung 870 Evo specifications:

Capacity: 250GB, 500GB, 1TB, 2TB, 4TB

Service warranty: Five years.

Rate: Starting from ₤ 38/ $50 (250GB).

Endurance rating: 150TBW (250B), 300TBW (500GB), 600TBW (1TB), 1200TBW (2TB), 2400TBW (4TB).

Theres most likely no need to hurry out and grab one right now, as you can still get the same sizes of the similarly quick 860 Evo for a lot less. As the 860 Evo begins to go end of life and becomes progressively difficult to get hold of, theres little doubt that the 870 Evo is primed and ready to take its location as the brand-new go-to SATA SSD for video gaming.
When I evaluated the 870 Evo in AS SSDs 1GB 4K random test, for example, which measures how quickly a drive can read and compose 1GBs worth of small 4K files, the 870 Evo completed with a time of 42MB/s read and 94MB/s compose. While not rather as sexy as the 500MB/s+ sequential speeds youll see on the box, these random test results are a much more accurate reflection of daily read and write speed, and in this regard the 870 Evo is pretty much on par with its 860 predecessor.
I presume it will likewise feel very similar to Samsungs high capability 870 Qvo drives, too, as the entry-level 1TB Qvo drive I checked a few months back completed the same test with 39MB/s checked out and an even nippier 111MB/s compose. As such, I reckon the 870 Qvo is still going to be the SATA SSD to opt for if youre after a drive thats 1TB or above, as the Evos greater costs merely dont get you considerably better performance.
Fortunately for the Evo, Samsungs Qvo drives dont can be found in 250GB and 500GB sizes, and in these sizes the 870 Evo still rules supreme compared to its closest competition. Vitals budget-oriented MX500 SSD just managed 37MB/s read and 73MB/s write, for example, while WDs Blue 3D NAND drive was available in with simply 29MB/s read and 57MB/s write.

Its not just SATA drives that the 870 Evo has to complete with these days. With NVMe drives such as the outstanding WD Blue SN550 choosing comparable, if not lower, prices, the 870 Evo ends up being progressively tough to recommend as a main SSD drive. Certainly, while the Blue SN550s random read speed of 44MB/s is approximately on par with the 870 Evo, its random write speed of 157MB/s is escape in front– and you can get a 500GB version of that for simply ₤ 53/ $52 at the moment, making it better worth than the ₤ 67/ $70 youll invest purchasing an 870 Evo.
Transfer speeds are likewise significantly increased, reaching well into the 1GB/s sphere on the WD Blue SN550, more than doubling whats possible on the 870 Evo. In AS SSDs copy benchmark, for instance, the 870 Evo finished its Game test with a score of 473MB/s.
Admittedly, my own real world tests werent quite as stark as this. When I copied my entire 98GB Assassins Creed Odyssey folder from my WD Black 3D NVMe SSD to the 870 Evo, for example, I saw a typical speed of around 375MB/s, and the entire procedure took around 4 minutes and 23 seconds. Copying the very same folder to the SN550, on the other hand, averaged roughly 650MB/s, however its more regular fluctuations in speed suggested it still took 3 minutes and 22 seconds to finish. A minute might not appear like much in contrast (definitely not when compared versus the 18 minutes it took to copy it to my WD Blue HDD), and its the type of amount of time I d more than happy to bear with if the 870 Evo was the less expensive drive in general.
Nevertheless, when the SN550 is both faster and less expensive than the 870 Evo, it makes little sense to decide for the latter unless you truly cant help it, such as your motherboard either does not support NVMe drives, or youve run out of M. 2 slots to put them in. The 870 Evo is still a great SATA drive in its own right, however the ever-changing landscape of SSD innovation means it no longer shines quite as brilliantly as its Evo predecessors once did.

The 860 Evo was already butting up against the fastest possible speeds offered on SATA, and so the 870 Evo was never actually going to use much concrete improvement in this regard. When I tested the 870 Evo in AS SSDs 1GB 4K random test, for example, which determines how quickly a drive can compose and read 1GBs worth of small 4K files, the 870 Evo completed with a time of 42MB/s checked out and 94MB/s write. With NVMe drives such as the exceptional WD Blue SN550 going for similar, if not lower, prices, the 870 Evo becomes increasingly hard to suggest as a main SSD drive. While the Blue SN550s random read speed of 44MB/s is approximately on par with the 870 Evo, its random write speed of 157MB/s is way out in front– and you can select up a 500GB variation of that for simply ₤ 53/ $52 at the minute, making it much better value than the ₤ 67/ $70 youll spend buying an 870 Evo.
A minute might not seem like much in comparison (certainly not when compared against the 18 minutes it took to copy it to my WD Blue HDD), and its the kind of time frame I d be happy to put up with if the 870 Evo was the cheaper drive in general.

Developed utilizing sixth-generation V-NAND technology and one of Samsungs brand-new MKX controllers, the 870 Evo is, to all intents and purposes, an extremely slightly quicker variation of the 860 Evo. Its top consecutive speeds of approximately 560MB/s checked out and as much as 530MB/s write are just minor bumps over what the 860 Evo currently uses with its particular rankings of 520MB/s and 550mb/s, and as well quickly see below, youre probably not going to observe a lot of distinction in everyday use.
In some methods, this isnt surprising. The 860 Evo was currently butting up versus the fastest possible speeds available on SATA, and so the 870 Evo was never ever actually going to offer much concrete enhancement in this regard. Heck, you may even be wondering why Samsung are troubling to release a new SATA SSD at all, provided the intrinsic limitations of its user interface and the increasing trend toward whatever being PCIe 4.0 these days.
I can just envision its to bring their consumer-focused Evo series in line with their 870 Qvo drives, although considered that the 870 Evos 1TB capacity is still set to cost ₤ 135/ $140 at launch, a full ₤ 45/ $30 more than what the comparable Qvo presently costs, I think prices will need to drop a fair bit prior to the 1TB, 2TB and 4TB Evo drives are deemed better value than their Qvo counterparts. Thankfully, the 870 Evo is still going to be available in 250GB and 500GB drives, which are set to cost ₤ 38/ $50 and ₤ 67/ $70 each.

User interface: SATA 6 Gb/s.

Kind factor: 2.5 in.

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