Katie Price reveals worries over disabled son Harvey going to residential college – Daily Mail

They are starring in a BBC documentary together called Harvey And Me, which charts a crucial year in his life in which he turns 18 and becomes an adult. 

And Katie Price, 42, and her beloved son Harvey showed off their incredible bond when they appeared on the Jeremy Vine show via video link on Thursday.

Harvey is on the autism spectrum and was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome, which causes an excessive appetite.

'No one can take away our bond': Katie Price revealed fears over disabled son Harvey, 18, going to residential college on Jeremy Vine on Thursday as she admitted 'it will break her heart'

'No one can take away our bond': Katie Price revealed fears over disabled son Harvey, 18, going to residential college on Jeremy Vine on Thursday as she admitted 'it will break her heart'

‘No one can take away our bond’: Katie Price revealed fears over disabled son Harvey, 18, going to residential college on Jeremy Vine on Thursday as she admitted ‘it will break her heart’

And Katie has enrolled him in a residential college from the age of 18-25 so that he can learn to be independent.

But the transition has been a worrying time for Katie because she has to put complete trust in the people who work there as his needs are so complex. 

‘We have been making some crucial decisions for him,’ Katie said. 

All you need is love: She also shared this pictured of her 'beautiful son' on Instagram, with their bond clear to see

All you need is love: She also shared this pictured of her 'beautiful son' on Instagram, with their bond clear to see

All you need is love: She also shared this pictured of her ‘beautiful son’ on Instagram, with their bond clear to see 

‘Where he will live when he leaves school. I want him to have as independent a life as possible.’

Jeremy has watched the documentary in advance of it airing on Monday and said: ‘It’s very moving. Well done Harvey. 

‘Everyone can see how special your relationship with your mum is and that you love her so much.

Jeremy has watched the documentary in advance of it airing on Monday and said: 'It's very moving. Well done Harvey'

Jeremy has watched the documentary in advance of it airing on Monday and said: 'It's very moving. Well done Harvey'

Jeremy has watched the documentary in advance of it airing on Monday and said: ‘It’s very moving. Well done Harvey’

‘And the conversation that you have with Harvey the whole way through, you say I love you. You can see what you mean to each other’

Harvey sweetly interjects: ‘I love you too, Jeremy.’

Katie said: ‘He wants me to finish his sentences. No one can take away the bond that we have. Everyone will see it. I hope it will be educational. 

‘It’s not an easy journey [finding a residential college]. It’s hard enough with an able kid but there’s all the paperwork and finding the right place for him. 

‘Obviously he’s not going to be with me, well, he will at weekends and holidays and stuff. But you know at school, you’ve got to be able to trust everyone there, it’s got to be the right education for him and it’s hard.

Doing her best for him: Jeremy said to Katie that he thinks she's going to miss Harvey so much and Katie said: 'It will break my heart, but I know he's not gone forever'

Doing her best for him: Jeremy said to Katie that he thinks she's going to miss Harvey so much and Katie said: 'It will break my heart, but I know he's not gone forever'

Doing her best for him: Jeremy said to Katie that he thinks she’s going to miss Harvey so much and Katie said: ‘It will break my heart, but I know he’s not gone forever’

‘Because of all his complex needs, it’s quite limited where he can go.  

‘So it’s just the journey with me and Harvey, strip back who I am and what I do for a living. It literally is a genuine documentary about me and my son and the journey of what other people go through too.

Jeremy said to Katie that he thinks she’s going to miss Harvey so much and Katie said: ‘It will break my heart, but I know he’s not gone forever.

‘I have to do it, I can’t be selfish because I would have him at home with me all the time. Even though it’s very challenging, he’s part of me isn’t he. He’s come to the age that just like with any kid you just have to let them explore the next level.’

Jeremy also asked Katie how she broke both her heels. 

‘It was a wall. Literally I jumped a small wall when we were all mucking about and I didn’t realise it was a 20-foot drop the other side. 

Appreciation: Katie also thanked the carers and nurses and said: 'Everyone take care and to all you carers and nurses, you're doing a fantastic job'

Appreciation: Katie also thanked the carers and nurses and said: 'Everyone take care and to all you carers and nurses, you're doing a fantastic job'

Appreciation: Katie also thanked the carers and nurses and said: ‘Everyone take care and to all you carers and nurses, you’re doing a fantastic job’

‘It’s life changing injuries which I’ve had. I struggled to walk. It will be forever. I smashed my feet up to bits. I’ve got screws in them now and metal plates. What’s wrong with mummy’s feet Harv?’

Harvey replied: ‘Get well soon mummy.’ 

She said: ”That’s right. So I’m only on my feet for about 20 minutes a day and that’s me done for the day. It is life changing and it was during the documentary that if happened, so then I needed a carer as well as being the carer. You just couldn’t make it up.’

Jeremy then mentioned Katie being in a wheelchair in the hospital. 

 

She said: 'That's right. That's when you get to see the real me, as a mum, with my son. I love you so much Harv'

She said: 'That's right. That's when you get to see the real me, as a mum, with my son. I love you so much Harv'

She said: ‘That’s right. That’s when you get to see the real me, as a mum, with my son. I love you so much Harv’

He said: ‘Then you were in a wheelchair in the hospital. There is a whole hospital element, because he’s being cared for by the same hospital as a child. So this is a big moment for Harvey isn’t it?’

Katie replied: ‘Very big moment. People have to realise, because it’s under Great Ormond Street and it’s a children’s hospital, it’s then a transition of the next stage. 

‘That’s even harder, because anyone out there will know that when you turn 18, obviously you’re an adult. So you have to go into hospital as an adult and you can’t stay with them overnight. 

‘My worry is what if he has to go into hospital and they won’t be able to cope with him. If you speak to Harvey the wrong way and he’s in that mood, he’ll just want to go and smash everything. Hey Harv?’

Her eldest child: Harvey was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome

Her eldest child: Harvey was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome

Her eldest child: Harvey was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome

She also thanked the carers and nurses and said: ‘Everyone take care and to all you carers and nurses, you’re doing a fantastic job.’

The interview finishes with Katie talking about the documentary, which goes out on the BBC, Monday at 8.30pm . 

She said: ‘That’s right. That’s when you get to see the real me, as a mum, with my son. I love you so much Harv.

Harvey replied: ‘I love you too.’

The Jeremy Vine Show airs weekdays at 9.15am, Channel 5. 

WHAT IS PRADER-WILLI SYNDROME?

Prader-Willi syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes problems including constant urges to eat food, restricted growth and reduced muscle tone.

Other potential issues include learning difficulties, lack of sexual development and behavioral problems such as tantrums or stubbornness.

The rare condition, which affects one in every 15,000 children born in England, is caused by a defect on chromosome number 15 – and happens by chance.

Because there is no cure, treatment aims to manage the symptoms – with parents of sufferers urged to get their children to stick to a healthy, balanced diet.

Children with the syndrome can eat up to six times more than children of the same age – and still feel hungry.

It was first described in 1956 by Swiss doctors A Prader, A Labhart and H Willi. 

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