Katie Price reveals holiday nightmare when armed police were called for son Harvey – Daily Mail

Katie Price has described the ‘nightmare’ moment she endured when armed police were called after her eldest son Harvey didn’t want to leave an airplane.

Harvey is on the autism spectrum and was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome, which can prompt mood swings and violent behaviour. 

Mother-of-five Katie, 42, told the BBC disability podcast Ouch that the teenager lashed out because he didn’t want the trip to end.

Nightmare: Katie Price has described the 'nightmare' moment she endured when armed police were called after her eldest son Harvey didn't want to leave an airplane

Nightmare: Katie Price has described the 'nightmare' moment she endured when armed police were called after her eldest son Harvey didn't want to leave an airplane

Nightmare: Katie Price has described the ‘nightmare’ moment she endured when armed police were called after her eldest son Harvey didn’t want to leave an airplane 

Recalling the incident, Katie said: ‘We had a bit of trouble on a plane not so long ago where he didn’t even want to come off the plane because he wanted to stay on holiday.

‘Everyone had to come off the other end of the plane. Then he kicked off, then all the armed police came.

‘Because they didn’t understand. I said it’s fine, he’s got autism, he just doesn’t want to get off the plane.

Care: Harvey is on the autism spectrum and was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome, which can prompt mood swings

Care: Harvey is on the autism spectrum and was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome, which can prompt mood swings

Care: Harvey is on the autism spectrum and was born with disabilities including partial blindness, ADHD and Prader-Willi syndrome, which can prompt mood swings 

‘He was trying to smash the phones off the walls in the airport and the tunnel. Oh my god it was a nightmare.

‘That’s because he didn’t want to get off the plane, he wanted to stay on holiday but he didn’t understand that you have to get off the plane. He does have his moments.’

Katie and Harvey are offering a candid look into their lives in a new BBC documentary.

Distressing: Mother-of-five Katie, 42, told the BBC disability podcast Ouch that the teenager lashed out because he didn't want the trip to end (pictured in 2019)

Distressing: Mother-of-five Katie, 42, told the BBC disability podcast Ouch that the teenager lashed out because he didn't want the trip to end (pictured in 2019)

Distressing: Mother-of-five Katie, 42, told the BBC disability podcast Ouch that the teenager lashed out because he didn’t want the trip to end (pictured in 2019)

Katie Price: Harvey and Me, which premiers at 8:30pm on Monday, January 25 will chronicle Harvey’s life as he turns 18.

Katie has enrolled him in a residential college from the age of 18-25 so that he can learn to be independent. 

But the transition has been a worrying time for Katie because she has to put complete trust in the people who work there as his needs are so complex. 

‘We have been making some crucial decisions for him,’ Katie said on Jeremy Vine earlier this week.  

‘Where he will live when he leaves school. I want him to have as independent a life as possible.’

Jeremy has watched the documentary in advance of it airing on Monday and said: ‘It’s very moving. Well done Harvey. 

Their story: Katie and Harvey are offering a candid look into their lives in a new BBC documentary

Their story: Katie and Harvey are offering a candid look into their lives in a new BBC documentary

Their story: Katie and Harvey are offering a candid look into their lives in a new BBC documentary

‘Everyone can see how special your relationship with your mum is and that you love her so much. 

‘And the conversation that you have with Harvey the whole way through, you say I love you. You can see what you mean to each other’

Harvey sweetly interjected: ‘I love you too, Jeremy.’

Katie said: ‘He wants me to finish his sentences. No one can take away the bond that we have. Everyone will see it. I hope it will be educational. 

‘It’s not an easy journey [finding a residential college]. It’s hard enough with an able kid but there’s all the paperwork and finding the right place for him. 

‘Obviously he’s not going to be with me, well, he will at weekends and holidays and stuff. But you know at school, you’ve got to be able to trust everyone there, it’s got to be the right education for him and it’s hard. 

‘Because of all his complex needs, it’s quite limited where he can go.  

‘So it’s just the journey with me and Harvey, strip back who I am and what I do for a living. It literally is a genuine documentary about me and my son and the journey of what other people go through too.

Jeremy said to Katie that he thinks she’s going to miss Harvey so much and Katie said: ‘It will break my heart, but I know he’s not gone forever.

‘I have to do it, I can’t be selfish because I would have him at home with me all the time. Even though it’s very challenging, he’s part of me isn’t he. He’s come to the age that just like with any kid you just have to let them explore the next level.’ 

'No one can take away our bond': Katie revealed her fears over disabled son Harvey, 18, going to residential college on Jeremy Vine on Thursday as she admitted 'it will break her heart'

'No one can take away our bond': Katie revealed her fears over disabled son Harvey, 18, going to residential college on Jeremy Vine on Thursday as she admitted 'it will break her heart'

‘No one can take away our bond’: Katie revealed her fears over disabled son Harvey, 18, going to residential college on Jeremy Vine on Thursday as she admitted ‘it will break her heart’

WHAT IS PRADER-WILLI SYNDROME?

Prader-Willi syndrome is a rare genetic condition that causes problems including constant urges to eat food, restricted growth and reduced muscle tone.

Other potential issues include learning difficulties, lack of sexual development and behavioral problems such as tantrums or stubbornness.

The rare condition, which affects one in every 15,000 children born in England, is caused by a defect on chromosome number 15 – and happens by chance.

Because there is no cure, treatment aims to manage the symptoms – with parents of sufferers urged to get their children to stick to a healthy, balanced diet.

Children with the syndrome can eat up to six times more than children of the same age – and still feel hungry.

It was first described in 1956 by Swiss doctors A Prader, A Labhart and H Willi. 

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